Emoticon

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The Huddle has developed a new program at The Huddle for middle years students where they explore how people overcome challenges through the stories of footballers here at The North Melbourne Football Club (NMFC). They identify the personal qualities they and the footballers draw upon to help them get through any challenges they may face. By creating a safe space at The Huddle, students go on to share their own stories in small groups and do a role-play to share with the whole group.

Emoticon has been a popular program and I have found the challenges that students are facing very interesting – moving to a new country, making friends in a new school, being bullied, being addicted to computer games, maintaining friendships, co-operating with siblings, learning in a new language, improving a skill, learning to be organized, hating maths, forgiving, fearing the water, hating their handwriting, feeling included in sport and so forth. Fairness often surfaces, and often relates to interaction with siblings which students agree seems to be an area rife with conflict. They have also noted that we often hold grudges longer and co-operate less readily with siblings than with friends.

Even more interesting has been the ability of young people to find solutions and support each other as well as seeing a light side to a situation while they are learning to deal with it and analyzing it – their ability to laugh it off!

Finding solutions is supported by group work and by the use of new technologies in The Huddle classroom. Once the students have reflected on their stories and identified a personal quality relevant to overcoming their challenge, they then go on to take photos and write captions – they make a poster about it using Comic Life.

As we may expect, young people are used to the camera and use it freely to express their emotions and relate their story. Students from diverse cultural backgrounds pose and pull faces to generate a story in a digital format using their own language and expression – and those who are literate in their first language also use it in their poster.

It is rewarding to see how students develop the language and concepts that enable them to discuss challenges openly. This is enabled by the honesty of the NMFC players and the challenges they have faced in recent times. Each player is interviewed to uncover a different sort of challenge, whether it be mental, physical or social – Lindsay Thomas and his lack of form in goal kicking in 2011; Leigh Adams and the “chicken-wing incident” in 2012; Majak Daw‘s entry into AFL and supporting his family to understand what being a professional athlete entails; Andrew Swallow as leader of the team; Jack Ziebell and the controversy around being reported in 2012.

The honesty and clarity of each player around their challenge and exactly how they overcame it, who supported them, the personal qualities and inner strength they had to find and the positives they gained from what could have been a negative experience all contribute towards a healthy discussion and open-minded outlook.

Having seen that other young adults, in this case NMFC players, are willing to share their challenges, creates a safe space for students to explore them selves and others.

To read about Emoticon from the perspective of NMFC Captain, Andrew Swallow, visit http://www.nmfc.com.au/news/2013-03-18/its-an-emoticon-game

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Arden St Oval Redevelopment 2013

The oval was dug up in 2012 to see what work needed to be done.
The oval was dug up in 2012 to see what work needed to be done.

Arden St oval redevelopment December 2012

The Arden St oval became a huge sandpit in December as workers dug it up, lay down sand and later rolled out grass for the oval to be of AFL standard and size. The ever changing visual of the Arden St oval is added to The Huddle’s program for schools students to inspire their movies about Arden St – what it means to the club and the impact on the environmental of inner Melbourne over the past 200 years.

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Arden St – lawn being rolled out for the players to use in March/April 2013.

“Maths Clinic” – Study Support program at The Huddle

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Students who choose to study at The Huddle are fortunate to have support from tertiary students from the Faculty of Business and Economics (FBE) at the University of Melbourne. This photo was taken in July last year when the Maths Clinic began. FBE students made learning lively with their enthusiasm, ideas and passion for the all things relating to number, as well as their genuine interest in helping others with their learning.

The FBE made a fabulous video about Maths Clinic and have sent new FBE students to us – they start this week and I look forward to meeting them and seeing how they inspire and encourage our current student group. There’s nothing better than learning from someone who is passionate about the topic!

http://benews.unimelb.edu.au/2012/bcom-students-north-melbourne-give-back/

Study Support Program at The Huddle

 

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The Huddle’s study support program for 15-25 year olds increases learning opportunities for young people by providing subject specific tutoring, access to internet and learning technologies, and language support for students for whom English is an additional language.

Students self refer to the program and are paired with a mentor once their educational needs and aspirations have been determined. The program allows for differentiated learning, group work and 1:1 and is responsive to individual learning styles. The bilingual skills of students are used a resource to enhance global online learning opportunities and build a community of learning for the 21st century.

The model supporting 15-25 year olds is unique as similar programs are generally aimed at primary and middle years learners where subject specific support is less pivotal to academic success.

The Program in 2012

It was wonderful to watch the Study Support Program’s communicative two way learning environment unfold!

The Maths Clinic with University of Melbourne‘s Faculty of Business and Economics students was also a hit. The tutors brought energy and enthusiasm to physical space. We trialled Writing Clinic by sourcing tutors from the Arts and education faculties enrolled in the breadth subject Understanding Knowing and Learning at the University of Melbourne. 

For more on this- watch this fabulous video: http://benews.unimelb.edu.au/2012/bcom-students-north-melbourne-give-back/

Students in the Study Support Program also took up opportunities to be involved in Shaping Futures, careers advice, and Words Beyond Rhythm as well as sports and match day activities. Words Beyond Rhythm was a project developed and delivered by a Master in Music Therapy student who worked with young women to develop poetry and writing skills with impressive educational and personal outcomes for participants.

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Arden St Oval

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Gasometer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Arden St oval is being upgraded to be of a size and quality for AFL. So we’ve been seeing it in transition over the past few weeks – from grass, to dirt, to a giant sandpit and back to grass again. It’s looking fabulous and we can’t wait to see it in use again!

I have some wonderful photos that we use in the Arden Street program to teach students about how the place has changed and how it has been used, so this is a good opportunity to revisit Arden St as it has been in the past and as it is today. The images are a good way of getting students to reflect on social spaces, the importance of gathering spaces for belonging and on how humans impact on environments. It also gets them thinking on how much care is taken to create and maintain sports and gathering places.

Arden St December 2012 – here it is dug up and then made into a huge sandpit:

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Below are some photos of Arden St from the 1900’s. They show the oval and the enormous gasometer which was such an important feature of North Melbourne until the 1970’s when it was removed. There are some great photos of players with the gasometer in the background – player Mick Nolan came to be known as “the galloping gasometer”. We always called it the gasometer but they often seem to be referred to as “gas holders”. There aren’t many of them I left in the world now as gas it stored differently.

This photo was taken in 1928:

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Locals used to come to Arden St for training in their own time after work – now players are professional sportsmen who come to Arden St everyday to work as players. You can see the gasometer in the background:

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Les Foote was awarded the Syd Barker medal 3 times. Here kicks the ball at Arden St in front of the gasometer:

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These photos show Arden St in the 1970’s and were given to me by a member but we don’t yet know what day they were taken on or who was playing. You can see how imposing the gasometer is. On this match day, a marching band and marching girls seem to have been the pre-match entertainment. The last photo with the banner at the ready for players to run through shows the old scoreboard and the Housing Commission flats in the background.

Arden St 1970’s – gasometer and marching band

January 2013

Here’s my first blog. I plan to post about community participation, the arts , innovation, education, multiculturalism, music and community projects that integrate these.

I work at The Huddle – the community arm of the North Melbourne Football Club. The Huddle specializes in innovation in education and community development with an overall aim of promoting social cohesion. We have a state of the art computer-based classroom which engages young people in digital storytelling about place, self and others.

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My role at The Huddle involves creating, developing and delivering educational programs for 8-16 year olds that cater for English language learners in mainstream classrooms and establishing a Study Support program for 15-25 year olds to support their learning.

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I am also a musician and composer. I play with strings and vocal trio Euphonia with my sister Dee Hannan and dear friend Alice Garner. I composed for the film One Night the Moon, with Kev Carmody and Paul Kelly and directed by Rachel Perkins. I also composed for the theatrical version of One Night the Moon directed by Wesley Enoch at Malthouse Theatre. I currently compose pieces for Xylouris Ensemble and Euphonia.

I like a balance between being a practitioner, creating new work, developing ideas and reflecting on and analyzing these to give new perspectives and approaches to what I do.

euphonia 2 M Hannan 2008