My Special Place

Image

 

At The Huddle we have a wall where we can write and draw places that hold special meaning for us. Anyone at The Huddle can contribute to the wall. We use our wall to dream, imagine and be creative and expressive. Through it we improve intercultural understanding, build identity and build a picture of our community for everyone to enjoy.

 

Image     Special place 2

Image      Special place

Talking confidence with indigenous AFL players

012

Students from the Midwest Clontarf Academy travelled from Geraldton to Melbourne as a reward for participation and effort in school last week. Once they complete school at the end of the year, they will be the largest cohort of indigenous students to complete school together in Australia’s history.

They joined us at The Huddle to talk to our amazing indigenous players, Daniel Wells and Lindsay Thomas. Both Wells and Thomas spoke of their past, their entry into footy and the opportunities that AFL has given them. They emphasized that a positive attitude, learning to be a leader (not a follower) and working hard is what helped them to be successful in AFL. They also spoke of their desire to give back to community and to support indigenous people. Their generosity, gratitude, enthusiasm and modesty were all noted. The discussion enabled students to consider career paths and how to make the most of opportunities that come their way.

Below are the strengths of character that the students identified in Wells and Thomas after talking with them. Conversations like these inspire young people to make plans, set goals, gain confidence and understand themselves and their place in the world. The Midwest Clontarf Academy’s logo “From Little Things, Big Things Grow” reinforces our work at The Huddle where connecting with players and others in the community helps all of us to listen, to be empathetic and to grow.

Strengths that students identified as Thomas and Wells having in common
Students identified these personal qualitites as ones that Thomas and Wells have in common023

For more on this see http://www.nmfc.com.au/news/2013-08-16/confidence-is-key

Early Melbourne

Image

Over the next few weeks, students will learn about the settlement of Melbourne and consider the impact of Europeans on the Koori people. The Huddle’s program “Early Melbourne” focuses on events in the early 1800’s, through the lives of three characters: William Barak, William Buckley and John Batman. Learning about this significant event, enables students to consider indigenous Australia, intercultural understanding and events that form the basis of our existence in modern-day Melbourne. This is pivotal to reconciliation, knowing the place we live in and building our community by understanding our place within it.

The program begins with a pre-learning activity I call “Graffiti the Treaty” where students write titles, captions, thought bubbles and speech bubbles on a painting of white settlers (John Batman) making a treaty with Koori leaders in 1835. This is done on our Samsung Slates, using its stylus and a digital image of the painting.

020post learning

They go on to learn about the lives of Barak, Batman and Buckley by viewing images and texts from the 1800’s – for example, a transcript of a treaty, paintings of the natural environment and early settlement, photographs of indigenous people at Flagstaff and paintings by William Barak. They also view video commentary on the significance of these that are sourced from Victoria’s key cultural institutions available through Culture Victoria http://www.cv.vic.gov.au and browse the National Museum of Australia’s interactive resource Batmania http://www.nma.gov.au/interactives/batmania/shell.html

Discussion, being an important part of learning at The Huddle, enables students to question the meanings behind images, facts and events, to uncover the interaction during settlement and express their own views on what happened in Victoria and the situation that indigenous people found themselves in. Through images and discussion, students who are less familiar with Australia because they have only lived here for a short time, are also able to examine the origins of Melbourne and express their views on it. Students rotate through learning stations to examine pictures, maps and artifacts relating to the content so they can recycle language and grasp concepts through discussion with their peers. They learn new words in Koori languages and identify how central Melbourne, the docks, bay and Yarra have changed over the past 200 years.

At the end of the program, I will ask students to discuss whether the exchange of items such as axes, mirrors, flour, blankets and scissors was a fair exchange for 500,000 acres of land and how the exchange and settlement could have happened differently. The students will also make “freeze frames”, shot on Samsung Slates, depicting scenes from the extraordinary life of William Buckley – the escapee who lived with the indigenous people around Port Phillip Bay for 32 years prior to the arrival of Batman and Faulkner.

008 019 005 001